TITLE

A New York City Jail-Community Re-Entry Collaboration

AUTHOR(S)
Lisante, Timothy F.; Navon, Beth
PUB. DATE
June 2000
SOURCE
Journal of Correctional Education;Jun2000, Vol. 51 Issue 2, p237
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There is a progressive school named for Austin H.MacCormick--founder of the Correctional Education Foundation, located on Riker's Island, New York City's corrections complex. This Board of Education alternative school issues the most General Educational Development (GED) diplomas, with the highest passing rate, of any program within a fourteen jail system that has custody of over 140,000 inmates annually.
ACCESSION #
11097016

 

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