TITLE

News

PUB. DATE
October 2003
SOURCE
Clinical Infectious Diseases;10/1/2003, Vol. 37 Issue 7, pi
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports developments related to infectious diseases in the U.S. as of October 2003. Evaluation of the degree and duration of vaccinia immunity after smallpox vaccination; Decision of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to suspend the tiered influenza vaccination schedule; Accounts on the cause of infections among competitive athletes.
ACCESSION #
11043761

 

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