TITLE

Prognostic significance of C-reactive protein in patients with intermediate-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with molecular targeted therapy

AUTHOR(S)
JUN TEISHIMA; KOHEI KOBATAKE; TETSUTARO HAYASHI; YASUYUKI SENO; KENICHIRO IKEDA; HIROTAKA NAGAMATSU; KEISUKE HIEDA; KOICHI SHOJI; KATSUTOSHI MIYAMOTO; SHOGO INOUE; KANAO KOBAYASHI; SHINYA OHARA; MITSURU KAJIWARA; AKIO MATSUBARA
PUB. DATE
August 2014
SOURCE
Oncology Letters;2014, Vol. 8 Issue 2, p881
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The present study aimed to investigate the impact of pre-treatment C-reactive protein (CRP) levels on the prediction of prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), who were classified as intermediate-risk patients using the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) risk classification and who received molecular targeted therapy. The oncological outcome of 140 patients with mRCC who underwent molecular targeted therapy was analyzed. Patients were divided into favorable-, intermediate- and poor-risk groups (groups F, I and P, respectively) based on the MSKCC risk classification. The patients in group I were then further classified into two groups based on pre-treatment serum CRP levels. The overall survival (OS) rates of the patients in these groups were then assessed. The OS rate of the patients in group I with normal pre-treatment CRP levels was found to be significantly increased compared with that of patients with high pre-treatment CRP levels (P<0.0001), while there was no significant difference in the OS rate in the patients with normal pre-treatment CRP levels in group I compared with those in group F. Multivariate analyses revealed that high pre-treatment CRP levels were an independent prognostic factor for OS in the patients in group I (P<0.0001; hazard ratio, 3.898). Thus, pre-treatment CRP levels may be a candidate predictor for OS in patients with intermediate-risk mRCC.
ACCESSION #
110397831

 

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