TITLE

Children of Inmates: The Effects of the Redress Movement Among Third Generation Japanese Americans

AUTHOR(S)
Takezawa, Yasuko I.
PUB. DATE
March 1991
SOURCE
Qualitative Sociology;Spring91, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p39
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
During the 1950s, it was predicted that Japanese American communities would eventually disappear. American society praised their "success story" and their social and economic mobility, as well as their assimilation into the mainstream of society proceeded remarkably. By Executive Order 9066 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast were uprooted from their homes to live in internment camps surrounded by barbed wire during the Second World War. Over 110,000 people of Japanese descent, including American citizens who constituted nearly two thirds of all the victims, were deprived of their constitutional rights and subjected to this evacuation and internment merely because of their Japanese ancestry. Internment and the consequent redress movement opened a new phase in the evolution of the Japanese American identity. Internment itself was an experience unique to Japanese Americans, and so was redress. Yet the process itself and means used in the quest for redress were as much symbolically American as the Government's recognition of its past inequity.
ACCESSION #
10951870

 

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