TITLE

A CENTENNIAL OF FLIGHT SPECIAL FEATURE

AUTHOR(S)
Desjarlais Jr., Orville F.
PUB. DATE
September 2003
SOURCE
Airman;Sep2003, Vol. 47 Issue 9, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Recalls significant events related to space travel of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Launch of Ham, a chimpanzee and the first primate to rocket into space aboard Mercury spacecraft on 1961; Highlights the suborbital flights of Virgil Grissom; Accomplishments of the in-space flight of Alan Shepard.
ACCESSION #
10936699

 

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