TITLE

New blood test could predict breast cancer relapse months before tumours show on scan

PUB. DATE
September 2015
SOURCE
Nursing Standard;9/2/2015, Vol. 30 Issue 1, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the development of a blood test capable of predicting breast cancer relapse months before tumours show on hospital scans by researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research, a public research institute, and The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust in England.
ACCESSION #
109253280

 

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