TITLE

Simple Strategies for Healthier Eating

PUB. DATE
September 2015
SOURCE
Women's Nutrition Connection;Sep2015, Vol. 18 Issue 9, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses several simple strategies for healthier eating, focusing on the role of the eating environment in what one eats, according to Brian Wansink, director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University. Topics include the basis of food choices in environmental cues, how the convenient, attractive, and normal (CAN) approach can improve diet, and ways to make food more convenient and attractive, such as cleaning and cutting up fruits and vegetables.
ACCESSION #
108877521

 

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