TITLE

HAWAIIAN ARCHAEOLOGY: The Pursuit of Antiquity in a Very Small Place

AUTHOR(S)
Kennedy, Joseph
PUB. DATE
September 1987
SOURCE
Archaeology;Sep/Oct87, Vol. 40 Issue 5, p58
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Chronicles the prehistoric Hawaiian archaeology. Kenneth Emory's excavation of a rock shelter located in Kuli-ou ou Valley, a suburb of Honolulu; Conflict between the Western Christianity and the Polynesian kapu system; Archaeologists who established a foundation for the professional study of Hawaiian antiquity; Books for practicing Hawaiian archaeologists; Development of archaeological projects under the direction of Roger Green, who was associated with the University of Hawaii.
ACCESSION #
10867109

 

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