TITLE

That Tickles!

PUB. DATE
September 2003
SOURCE
Weekly Reader News - Senior;9/19/2003, Vol. 82 Issue 4, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a study on the influence of brain on tickling. Function of the cerebellum; Details of how the brain protects the body.
ACCESSION #
10841621

 

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