TITLE

Why the BBC is losing

AUTHOR(S)
Cohen, Nick
PUB. DATE
August 2003
SOURCE
New Statesman;8/25/2003, Vol. 132 Issue 4652, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Offers observations on the Hutton inquiry into the death of Dr. David Kelly, a weapons of mass destruction advisor to the British government prior to the outbreak of the Iraq War. Claim of members of the administration of Prime Minister Tony Blair that they did not manipulate intelligence reports in order to justify the war; Suggestion that despite claims to the contrary, Great Britain entered the war in order to maintain the alliance with the United States; Outlook for the investigation.
ACCESSION #
10688892

 

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