TITLE

HOT NOT

PUB. DATE
October 2003
SOURCE
Joe Weider's Muscle & Fitness;Oct2003, Vol. 64 Issue 10, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Compares buckwheat with alfalfa seeds and sprouts. Nutrients found in buckwheat; Bacteria associated with alfalfa seeds and sprouts.
ACCESSION #
10673584

 

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