TITLE

St Augustine: A Spanish

PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Spanish Exploration of Florida;2003, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
On September 8, 1565, Seloy, a Timucua Indian chief, stood watching the Spanish fleet anchor offshore. From his great house, he watched as Pedro Menéndez de Avilés stepped ashore from a small boat and knelt. Chief Seloy welcomed these strangers to his village and offered them shelter in his own home. Menéndez converted the area into a fort and named it St. Augustine, because for Catholics it was the day to honor this particular saint. It was the Spanish king, Philip II, who had sent these ships to the New World. Europe had changed in the 52 years since Ponce de León had first sighted the land he called Florida. News had reached Philip that France was attempting to plant a colony somewhere along the eastern coast of Florida. When King Philip learned that the French had already built Fort Caroline on the east coast of Florida, he ordered Menéndez to get rid of the French forces. Menéndez sailed for Cadíz with 1,000 people. The French fleet was already docked at Fort Caroline, so Menéndez went 40 miles south and landed at the Indian village of Seloy, renaming the area St. Augustine. INSETS: Pedro Menéndez de Avilés;Untitled.
ACCESSION #
10664855

 

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