TITLE

A hip theory for human evolution

AUTHOR(S)
Lewin, Roger
PUB. DATE
November 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;11/16/91, Vol. 132 Issue 1795, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on Johns Hopkins University scientist Christopher Ruff's theory that the body shape of humans is mainly determined by the need to lose heat. Role of heat loss in determining pelvis width in tall and short hominids living in similar climates; Ruff's findings on pelvis width in modern populations in Africa.
ACCESSION #
10558855

 

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