TITLE

Blooming algae warm the world

PUB. DATE
September 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;9/7/91, Vol. 131 Issue 1785, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the finding that algae that bloom in the oceans are a source of carbon dioxide and will probably speed the process of global warming rather than slow it down. Sampling of spring blooms in the North Atlantic taken by British researchers aboard the RRS Charles Darwin, a vessel of the Natural Environment Research Council.
ACCESSION #
10556908

 

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