TITLE

Born-again quagga defies extinction

AUTHOR(S)
d'Alessio, Vittorio
PUB. DATE
November 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;11/30/91, Vol. 132 Issue 1797, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the effort of scientists to resurrect the quagga from extinction in South Africa. Birth of a foal similar to the preserved remains of the quagga; Dispersal of genes responsible for coat markings in the plains zebra population; Retrieval of genes in zebra with quagga-like characteristics.
ACCESSION #
10553158

 

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