TITLE

Was the Cambrian period evolution's golden age?

AUTHOR(S)
Rudder, Ben
PUB. DATE
October 1991
SOURCE
New Scientist;10/12/91, Vol. 132 Issue 1790, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides some insights into the theory about the diversity and evolutionary history of early arthropods. Investigation of fossil evidence of the Burgess Shale in British Columbia, Canada; Types of fossils; Proposal of an evolutionary mechanism during the Cambrian period for a group of arthropods; Comparison of different types of fossil arthropods.
ACCESSION #
10552648

 

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