TITLE

Soviet-American Relations: What Now Are the Negotiable Items?

AUTHOR(S)
Laqueur, Walter Z.
PUB. DATE
February 1961
SOURCE
New Republic;2/27/61, Vol. 144 Issue 9, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Encourages the government of U.S. President John F. Kennedy to seize the opportune moment to rebuild its relationship with the Soviet Union based on peaceful co-existence and on changing alignment within the international communist movement in 1961. Nonexistence of condition by which the U.S. and the Soviet Union can forge international security and territorial arrangements; Possible agreement between the U.S. and the Soviet Union on disarmament; Advantages of wider U.S.-Soviet Union cultural exchanges.
ACCESSION #
10539711

 

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