TITLE

HORIZONTAL FEDERALISM IN THE NEW JUDICIAL FEDERALISM: A PRELIMINARY LOOK AT CITATIONS

AUTHOR(S)
Cauthen, James N. G.
PUB. DATE
May 2003
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2003, Vol. 66 Issue 3, p783
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on a study that investigated the level of horizontal federalism in state civil liberties interpretation through a citation analysis of state constitutional decisions. Explanation on the expansion of rights and horizontal federalism; Methodology of the study; Results of the study.
ACCESSION #
10528529

 

Related Articles

  • SIN GARANTÍAS NO HAY DERECHOS. SIN DERECHOS NO HAY CONSTITUCIÓN. APUNTES SOBRE LA PROTECCIÓN JURISDICCIONAL DE LOS DERECHOS EN ECUADOR. APARICIO WILHELMI, MARCO // Revista de Derecho Politico;sep-dic2011, Issue 82, p581 

    This paper focuses its analysis on the rights' judicial guarantees set by the current Constitution of Ecuador, according to the development made by the Ley Orgánica de Garantías Jurisdiccionales y Control Constitucional (September 21th, 2009). To reach this goal, a brief introduction...

  • Splitting the Atom of Property: Rights Experimentalism as Obligation to Future Generations. Colburn, Jamison E. // George Washington Law Review;Sep2009, Vol. 77 Issue 5/6, p1411 

    The Framers split the atom of sovereignty. It was the genius of their idea that our citizens would have two political capacities, one state and one federal, each protected from incursion by the other. The resulting Constitution created a legal system unprecedented in form and design,...

  • From Roots to Branches and Back: Popular Sovereignty Within Constitutional Theory. Moore, Wayne D. // Good Society Journal;2004, Vol. 13 Issue 2, p15 

    The article discusses on how well constitutional theory as a field assesses, studies and crafts scholarship related to the constitution of good regimes. Constitutional theory has important roles in studying constitutions and constitutional institutions even if they fall well short of...

  • Is Federal Action Preferable to State Action? Con. Terry, Charles T. // Congressional Digest;Jun/Jul27, Vol. 6 Issue 6/7, p197 

    The article focuses on views of the author who is a Former Chairman of Conference on Uniform State laws, on whether federal action is preferable to the state action. Either the states must bring about such harmony , or the Federal Government must do it. For the Federal Government to do it means...

  • CONSTITUTIONAL DEFLATION AND THE REBOUND EFFECT: THE CHARTER AND THE ENHANCEMENT OF STATE POWER. Paciocco, David M. // Canadian Issues / Thèmes Canadiens;Fall2007, p89 

    It is commonplace that the Charter has limited State power in important ways. This article addresses a less recognized phenomenon—that the Charter has also been a vehicle for enhancing State power. According to the author, it has done so in two ways. The first is through "constitutional...

  • Shared Government.  // Canada & the World Backgrounder;Dec2005, Vol. 71 Issue 3, p4 

    No abstract available.

  • First Amendment. Cox, Archibald // Society;Nov/Dec86, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p8 

    This article focuses on the history and development of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment today protects the overlapping realms of the spirit -- of belief, emotion, and reason -- and of political activity against intrusion by government. The amendment directly forbids...

  • Saving Federalism. Epstein, Richard A.; Loyola, Mario // National Affairs;Summer2014, Vol. 20, p3 

    The article focuses on the threat to U.S. federalism. Topics discussed include the constitutional transformation starting with the 16th and 17th Amendment, the concept of cooperative federalism, the system of checks and balances of a divided government, major developments that allowed federal...

  • Roe Rage: Democratic Constitutionalism and Backlash. Post, Robert; Siegel, Reva // Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review;Summer2007, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p373 

    The article discusses how judicial courts function in the U.S. democracy. The authors propose a model that they call democratic constitutionalism to analyze the understandings and practices by which constitutional rights have historically been established in the context of cultural controversy....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics