TITLE

War Games in Vietnam: Tennis Anyone?

AUTHOR(S)
Vinnedge, Harlan H.
PUB. DATE
May 1972
SOURCE
New Republic;5/6/72, Vol. 166 Issue 19, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the scope of the military aid provided by the Soviet Union to North Vietnam. Estimation of Soviet military aid stands at $8 billion; Dangers in attributing the North Vietnamese capability to the availability of Soviet heavy weapons; Effectiveness of Soviet weapons in North Vietnam compared to the U.S. weapons in South Vietnam; Introduction of a new factor; Deployment of weapons beyond the borders of North Vietnam; Success of North Vietnam attributed to higher quality of the Soviet heavy weapons, superior ability of the North Vietnamese army and deployment of Soviet heavy weapons beyond the borders of North Vietnam.
ACCESSION #
10451035

 

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