TITLE

Laboratory work preceding the first clinical application of cardiopulmonary bypass

AUTHOR(S)
Miller, Bernard J.
PUB. DATE
May 2003
SOURCE
Perfusion;May2003, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p145
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
As a young surgeon tending to a patient who had suffered a massive pulmonary embolism, Dr. John H. Gibbon Jr. envisioned the usefulness of an extracorporeal circuit in the surgical management of both pulmonary embolism and in the correction of congenital intracardiac defects during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and under direct vision. Gibbon first demonstrated the feasibility of such an operation in 1937, when he was able to clamp the pulmonary artery of a cat while an extracorporeal circuit maintained the cardiorespiratory function of the animal. In the spring of 1953, Dr John Gibbon Jr. performed for the first time closure of an interatrial septal defect in an 18-year-old female patient while her cardiorespiratory functions were maintained by an extracorporeal circuit containing a mechanical heart and a mechanical lung. A new machine was to be constructed with the aim of incorporating anticipated improvements and developments. The first priority was to develop an oxygenator capable of supporting the cardiorespiratory function of a large dog. The engineers involved in this project were Alf Malmros, Leo Farr, and John Engstrom. A small test oxygenator was constructed using strips of screens of different wire sizes, mesh sizes, and materials suspended from a weir of 0.015 in. in width. This test device was then suspended in a cylinder containing oxygen. The oxygenation characteristics of each surface were measured as blood flowed down the surface.
ACCESSION #
10378533

 

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