TITLE

Origin of the helical reservoir bubble oxygenator heart-lung machine

AUTHOR(S)
Dewall, Richard A.
PUB. DATE
May 2003
SOURCE
Perfusion;May2003, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p163
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Thoughts of maintaining life for a short period of time during the exclusion of the heart from general circulation have been acknowledged for nearly 150 years. This concept envisioned a heart-lung bypass machine. The first step to make cardiopulmonary bypass surgery a reality occurred at Johns Hopkins University in 1916. Jay McLean, a medical student who worked in Dr William Howell's laboratory, discovered a substance that would make bypass surgery possible. Howell named this agent heparin, which proved to be an anticoagulant. After the second world war, Dr John Gibbon Jr. continued work with extracorporeal circulation using a newly designed parallel screen oxygenator. This system achieved clinical success in May 1953. His subsequent efforts were disappointing. At the same time, many medical centers around the world experimented with their own pump-oxygenator systems.
ACCESSION #
10378531

 

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