TITLE

A multicentre, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial, comparing high flow therapy with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress (the HIPSTER trial): study protocol

AUTHOR(S)
Roberts, Calum T.; Owen, Louise S.; Manley, Brett J.; Donath, Susan M.; Davis, Peter G.
PUB. DATE
June 2015
SOURCE
BMJ Open;Jun2015, Vol. 5 Issue 6, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
103675293

 

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