TITLE

Nurses working in detention centres face prison if speak out

PUB. DATE
July 2015
SOURCE
Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal;Jul2015, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article informs that Under the Australian Border Force Act of Australia that doctors and nurses working in immigration detention facilities could face prosecution and imprisonment if they reveal anything that happens in detention centers like Nauru and Manus Island.
ACCESSION #
103674105

 

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