TITLE

Kennedy and De Gaulle

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel, Jean
PUB. DATE
May 1961
SOURCE
New Republic;5/29/61, Vol. 144 Issue 22, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Criticizes the negative attitude of French President Charles de Gaulle toward U.S. President John F. Kennedy in 1961. Basis for the foreign policy of the de Gaulle administration; Factor which contributed to the contempt of de Gaulle toward Kennedy; Position of de Gaulle on the U.S. failure to invade Cuba and its impact on the West; Factors which contributed to the negative attitude of de Gaulle toward the political leadership of Kennedy.
ACCESSION #
10253061

 

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