TITLE

Message on the Pearl Harbour Attack

AUTHOR(S)
Schlesinger jr., Arthur M.; Israel, Fred L.; Frent, David J.
PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Election of 1932 & the Administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt;2003, p104
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, Japanese naval aircrafts bombed the United States' Pearl Harbor naval base in Hawaii. The attack was a complete surprise. The day after the Pearl Harbor attack, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to accept the "state of war" that Japan's "unprovoked and dastardly attack" had thrust upon the United States. Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States. On December 7, 1941 the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan. The United States was at peace with that nation and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with the government and its emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. Indeed, one hour after Japanese air squadrons had commenced bombing in Oahu, the Japanese ambassador to the United States and his colleagues delivered to the Secretary of State a formal reply to a recent American message. While this reply stated that it seemed useless to continue the existing diplomatic negotiations, it contained no threat or hint of war or armed attack. Roosevelt asked that the Congress declare that since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, December 7, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese empire. Neutrality was rapidly discarded as the United States, led by a president determined to aid the European democracies, edged closer toward war.
ACCESSION #
10239994

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics