TITLE

ASSESSMENT OF THE SENSITIVITY OF URINE SAMPLE TESTING FOR CHLAMYDIA INFECTION IN WOMEN PRESENTING FOR TERMINATION OF PREGNANCY

AUTHOR(S)
Wilkinson, H.; Ivens, D.
PUB. DATE
June 2003
SOURCE
Sexually Transmitted Infections;Jun2003 Supplement 1, Vol. 79, pA13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objectives: To determine the sensitivity of urine samples compared with endocervical swabs for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a termination of pregnancy (TOP) assessment clinic at the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust. To compare the results with samples taken from non-pregnant women attending a local genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic at the same hospital. Background: Women attending both clinics are offered testing for chlamydia infection. Endocervical swabs and urine samples are tested using a Strand Displacement Assay (SDA). Methods: A retrospective case notes review of women diagnosed with chlomydia attending both clinics was undertaken. A positive diagnosis was defined by either a positive urine or endocervical swab result. Only paired samples were included. Results: There were 44 cases of chlamydia diagnosed in women attending the TOP clinic of which 36 were positive in both samples. Of the remaining 8 samples, 6 were positive in the endocervical swab only and 2 in the urine. Of the 114 cases of chlamydia infection diagnosed in GUM clinic group, 77 were positive in both samples. Of the remaining 37 samples, 26 were only endocervical swab positive and 11 urine positive. The sensitivity of the urine sample compared to a positive result was 86% in the TOP group and 77% in the GU clinic group. Conclusion: The urine samples were less sensitive than the endocervical swabs in both groups. The SDA assay performed slightly better on the urine samples taken from the pregnant women.
ACCESSION #
10218772

 

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