TITLE

Labor's Al Barkan

AUTHOR(S)
Wieck, Paul R.
PUB. DATE
March 1973
SOURCE
New Republic;3/24/73, Vol. 168 Issue 12, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organization (AFL-CIO) Director Alexander E. Barkan's recommendations for the charter commission being named by Democratic National Chairman Jean Westwood. AFL-CIO leadership of Barkan; Barkan's choices for the commission as Westwood's administrative aide; Barkan's desire to add more blacks and women in the list; Highlights of Barkan's political career; Challenges encountered by Barkan as director of the AFL-CIO.
ACCESSION #
10211727

 

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