TITLE

Jurisprudence As An Undergraduate Study

AUTHOR(S)
Kocourek, Albert
PUB. DATE
May 1920
SOURCE
California Law Review;May20, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p232
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses attitudes toward jurisprudence in legal education. Alternatives suggested by the attitude which is unwilling to admit it as an undergraduate law study; Uses of legal source books; Reasons for the negative opposition of the use of jurisprudence for law school purposes.
ACCESSION #
10210342

 

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