TITLE

Arms for What?

AUTHOR(S)
Scoville Jr., Herbert
PUB. DATE
May 1973
SOURCE
New Republic;5/26/73, Vol. 168 Issue 21, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses United States President Richard Nixon's fourth annual review of foreign policy in light of the shifts in the nuclear equation resulting from the Moscow arms agreements. Strategic forces that are still positioned at the center of national security; Firing of all senior officials who had been part of the SALT negotiations; Nixon's optimism about the second round of SALT; Support of the modernization of strategic forces on both sides; Installation of rapid retargeting capability through the so-called Command Data Buffer System.
ACCESSION #
10199275

 

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