TITLE

14 top tips when buying a breeding bull14 tops tips when buying a breeding bull

PUB. DATE
January 2015
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;1/30/2015, Issue 985, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents tips offered by Gavin Hill, beef specialist at consulting firm SAC Consulting, for purchasing a breeding bull from sales. Topics include spending plenty of time watching the bulls and then watching them against their contemporaries; making sure that the correct levels of energy, protein and vitamins and minerals are being fed to them after the purchase; and giving the bull a veterinary pre-breeding examination before he is used to check he is physically normal.
ACCESSION #
100747914

 

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