TITLE

New Jersey Man Pulled Over for Routine Traffic Stop, Police Find 2 Kidnapped Men In His Car

PUB. DATE
January 2015
SOURCE
People.com;1/28/2015, pN.PAG
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Luis A. Moreno, Jr. is being held on $1 million bail
ACCESSION #
100677099

 

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