TITLE

How We Can Profit from Communist Disunity

AUTHOR(S)
Brzezinski, Zhigniew
PUB. DATE
March 1962
SOURCE
New Republic;3/26/62, Vol. 146 Issue 13, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Recommends a U.S. foreign policy of peaceful engagement with communist countries amid the escalation of the Sino-Soviet dispute. Claims that the policy of containment of Soviet Union expansion and liberation ceased to be relevant; Consequences of the Sino-Soviet split; Recognition by the Soviet Union of U.S. capacity to make counterattacks in case of war; Discussion on the policy of fraternization on the basis of firmness with Soviet leaders; Factors involved in the application of the policy of differentiated amity and hostility to China.
ACCESSION #
10023379

 

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