TITLE

Physical medicine & rehabilitation

PUB. DATE
August 1997
SOURCE
Clinical & Investigative Medicine;Aug97 Supplement, Vol. 20, pS77
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Abstract
ABSTRACT
Presents an abstract of the research manuscript `The efficacy of tropical diclofenac for lateral epicondylitis,' by R. Burnham et al.
ACCESSION #
9708236967

 

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