TITLE

The effect of SHBG gene polymorphism and idiopathic male infertility

AUTHOR(S)
Emamdoost, F.; Mashayekhi, F.; Bahadori, M. H.
PUB. DATE
June 2014
SOURCE
Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine;Jun2014 Supplement, Vol. 12, p69
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Abstract
ABSTRACT
Introduction: Infertility is defined as a lack of conception in a couple that has been having unprotected intercourse, one to three times per week, for one year. Male infertility may result from a variety of causes. The list of known causes of male infertility is long and varied, but can be divided into 4 major categories: 1) hypothalamic-pituitary disorders (1-2%) 2) primary gonadal disorders (30-40%), 3) disorders of sperm transport (10-20%); and 4) idiopathic (40-50%).Male factor infertility 35%. Genetics contributes to infertility by influencing a variety of physiological processes including hormonal homeostasis, spermatogenesis, and sperm quality. Therefore, an understanding of the genetic basis of reproductive failure is essential to appropriately manage an infertile couple. The sex hormone- binding globulin (SHBG) gene, located on chromosome 17, has also been studied for a possible role in spermatogenesis. The gene is involved in both delivering sex hormones to target tissues and controlling the concentration of androgens in the testis. Androgens play important roles in sexual differentiation and the process of spermatogenesis. We aimed to study the association between SHBG gene polymorphism and idiopathic male infertility in a northern Iran. Materials and Methods: Genotyping of polymorphisms we performed by allele specific polymerase change reaction (AS-PCR) techniques (rs 1799941). Results: We found no significant association between SHBG gene polymorphism and idiopathic male infertility in population (p=0.1). Conclusion: So this study is necessary investigated in a greater population.
ACCESSION #
96841649

 

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